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Chillicothe News - Chillicothe, MO
Take a trip down memory lane as bloggers Danny Batson and Gary Thomas recollect their experiences while growing up in the Chillicothe area. We hope our discussion starters, pictures, and articles will evoke your personal recollections of Chillicothe; we invite you to share your stories with all of us. So, let us discuss the days gone by and have fun!
"The Wooden Bowl" and Life Lessons by Danny Batson
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About this blog
By Gary Thomas

Hi, I am Danny Batson (Knouse) and I am a lifelong resident of the Chillicothe area. I was born in 1951 and graduated from CHS in 1969. I took over my dad’s septic tank business that he founded in 1937. While I have been in every state ...

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Chillicothe: As We Remember

Hi, I am Danny Batson (Knouse) and I am a lifelong resident of the Chillicothe area. I was born in 1951 and graduated from CHS in 1969. I took over my dad’s septic tank business that he founded in 1937. While I have been in every state (except Hawaii and Maine), there is no place like home! I love taking pictures of old and unusual things and sharing them. There is beauty in everything, if we look for it. I have three Facebook pages filled with local pictures that may be of interest: “Where Has Danny Been,” Chillicothe Now,” and “Danny Batson”.

Hi, I am Gary Thomas and I was born just across from Central School in 1942. I graduated from CHS in 1960 and MU in 1964. After two years in Army, I completed a graduate degree at the University of Chicago in 1970. After working in software development for more than 40 years, I retired from Raytheon in 2007. I have an abiding interest in history and in researching past events, places, and people. My latest project is developing a history-based chronology for Livingston County from 1801-2000.

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June 25, 2012 12:01 a.m.



First, a story from the net to share : “The Wooden Bowl”



A frail old man went to live with his son, daughter-in-law, and his four-year-old grandson. The old man's hands trembled, his eyesight blurred, and his step faltered.

The family always ate their meals at the dining room table. But the elderly grandfather's shaky hands and failing sight made eating difficult. Peas rolled off his spoon onto the floor. Sometimes when he grasped his glass to drink, milk spilled onto the tablecloth.

His son and daughter-in-law became more and more irritated with the messes he always seemed to make. 'We must do something about father,' said the son. “I've had enough of spilled milk, noisy eating, and food on the floor.”

So, they placed a small table and chair in the corner of room. There, Grandfather ate alone while the rest of the family enjoyed their dinner. Since Grandfather had broken a dish or two, his food was served in a wooden bowl.

When the family glanced in Grandfather's direction, sometimes he had a tear in his eye as he sat there---silent and alone. Still, the only words the couple had for him were sharp admonitions when he dropped a fork or spilled some food.

The four-year-old grandson watched all that had happened without comment. One evening, just before supper, the father noticed his son playing with some scraps of wood on the floor. He asked the child sweetly, 'son, what are you making?'

Just as sweetly, the boy responded. ”Oh, I am making little bowls for you and mama to eat your food in when I grow up.” The four-year-old smiled and went back to his work.

His words struck the parents speechless; tears started streaming down their cheeks. Without another word, both knew what must be done. That evening the son took his father's hand and gently led him back to the family table.

For the remainder of his days he ate every meal with the family. Neither husband nor wife cared any longer when a fork was dropped, some milk spilled, or a tablecloth soiled.

Second, Some Lessons I Have Learned

I've learned that, no matter what happens, how bad it seems today, life does go on, and it will be better tomorrow.

 I've learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles four things: a rainy day, the elderly, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights.

 I've learned that making a 'living' is not the same thing as making a “life.”

I've learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance.

I've learned that you shouldn't go through life with a catcher's mitt on both hands. You need to be able to throw something back sometimes.

I've learned that if you pursue happiness, it will elude you. But, if you focus on God, your family, your friends, the needs of others, and doing the very best you can at your work; happiness will find you.

I've learned that whenever I decide something with an open heart, I usually make the right decision.

I've learned that even when I have pains, I don't have to be one.

I've learned that every day, you should reach out and touch someone.  People love that human touch; holding hands, a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back.

I've learned that I still have a lot to learn.

DB

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