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Chillicothe News - Chillicothe, MO
  • Harvest in full swing

  • Harvest is well underway in Livingston County. According to David Meneely, Livingston County executive director for the U.S. Department of Agriculture — Farm Services Agency, roughly 80 percent of the county's corn crop and 60 percent of the county's soybean crop has been harvested.
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  • Harvest is well underway in Livingston County. According to David Meneely, Livingston County executive director for the U.S. Department of Agriculture — Farm Services Agency, roughly 80 percent of the county's corn crop and 60 percent of the county's soybean crop has been harvested.
    Ag producers were busy in the fields and at grain elevators yesterday (Monday) ahead of Tuesday morning's rainfall. Meneely said while the rain is great for pastures, livestock and planting winter wheat, it can create headaches for producers in low-lying fields.
    "We farm a lot of bottom land in Livingston County," Meneely explained. "When it's dry, you can take trucks and combines in there and not fight the mud. In that sense, dry conditions are great. You can drive anywhere you need to haul the crop out. When the dew is gone, you're ready to harvest a day's worth of work."
    Meneely said yields appear to be slightly better than last year, but still under average. He estimates around 90 bushels of corn and 26 bushels of soybeans per acre to be harvested. Averages for Livingston County are around 115 bushels of corn and 35 bushels of soybeans per acre.
    Rainfall totals were well below average for most of this year's growing season. Meneely said a decent yield can be credited to improvements in seed quality genetics.
    "As dry as it was, it's a credit to the plants that we have as good as yields as we do have," Meneely said. "In the '80s, we had a larger crop failure because of hot, dry weather, plants just couldn't tolerate that lack of moisture. There have been improvements in seed genetics, but we still need the rainfall in July, August, September and October to have a better yield."
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