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Chillicothe News - Chillicothe, MO
  • Big night for truck and tractor pull; cool temperatures in the forecast

  • The Livingston County 4-H and FFA Fair got off to a roaring start Friday evening at the Livingston County Fairgrounds with a truck and tractor pull that lasted into the wee hours of Saturday morning.
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  •  The Livingston County 4-H and FFA Fair got off to a roaring start Friday evening at the Livingston County Fairgrounds with a truck and tractor pull that lasted into the wee hours of Saturday morning. An estimated 1,400 people attended the event and most stayed up through midnight. “The last pull was at 3 a.m.,” said Livingston County Fair Board President David Beck. “The crowd hung with us most of the night, and began to dwindle around 1 a.m.” There were 110 pulls for the event, a few more than normal, with entries coming from throughout Missouri as well as Illinois and Iowa. The event is a sanctioned pull which allows participants to gain points by how well they do in the contest. With admission at $10 for individuals older than 8 years of age, the event is a big fund-raiser for the fair. Temperatures on Friday reached 90 degrees and the humidity was high, perhaps contributing to a good night at the concession stand. On Saturday, the shooting sports competitions took place — archery on the Litton Ag Campus and BB/pellet and small bore shoot at the Beck home. Also Saturday, interviews of the queen and princess candidates took place. Sunday was a big day at the fairgrounds. Campers started arriving and there was judging for the fashion revue and baby contest, as well as style show modeling. A highlight of the day was the coronation of the fair queen, princess, junior princess and clover princess. Cyrsten Lollar was crowned queen, Echo Essick as princess, Meredith Oesch as junior princess, and Joslyn Alkire as clover princess. The horse show, scheduled for 5 p.m. Sunday, was postponed until next Saturday, July 19, due to wet arena conditions from an estimated inch of rain falling overnight Saturday. “It was a sloppy mess,” Beck said, noting Friday night’s use of the arena for the truck and tractor pull. “In the interest of safety, we thought it would be best to wait on the horse show,” he said. Fair week, usually marked as one of the hottest weeks of summer, has a cool outlook this year, with high temperatures forecast in the 70s and lows dipping into the 50s. Tuesday is expected to reach a high of 73, with an overnight low of 52. The poultry show will take place on Tuesday, and hogs and rabbits will start arriving on the grounds. On Wednesday, when most livestock arrives at the fairgrounds, the high is forecast at 75, with an overnight low of 56. The rabbit show starts at 8 a.m., and the swine show will begin at 1 p.m. The Country Jamboree, featuring local talent, will take place at 7 p.m. in the outdoor arena with a free will donation. Thursday’s high temperature is forecast at 76, with an overnight low of 58. Thursday begins with the sheep show at 8 a.m., followed by the goat show. The cattle shows are in the afternoon. The dairy, breeding cattle, and feeder calves shows start at 1 p.m., with the steer show at 3 p.m. The 4-H Foundation will host an ice cream social from 5 until 6:15 p.m., followed by the Super Teen Contest at 7:30 p.m. in the outdoor arena. On Friday, the mercury is expected to top out at 80 with a low of 61. The day begins with the Farm Bureau breakfast at 7 a.m., followed by the Clover Kid animal parade at 9 a.m. and the bucket calf show at 10 a.m. The Appreciation Picnic will be from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m., with the market animal sale beginning at 7 p.m. Beck said he can recall only one other fair which had cooler temperatures and that occurred when the fair was held at the old fairgrounds near the airport.

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