Chillicothe City Council members heard the first two of several annual reports that will be made by entities with which the city contracts to provide services to city residents.

Chillicothe City Council members heard the first two of several annual reports that will be made by entities with which the city contracts to provide services to city residents. The reports of the Livingston County Humane Society and the Chillicothe Area Arts Council were made during the council’s regular meeting Monday evening at City Hall. In her report to the council, Lesley Patek, shelter guardian for the Livingston County Humane Society, stated that the society is requesting an additional $2,000 in its contract over last year to help with the increase in the cost of living (such as veterinary bills, food, wages and supplies). The Humane Society is just one of several annual contracts that City Council members will review during the next several meetings as they formulate the 2017-18 city budget for the new fiscal year, which begins April 1. Last year’s contract called for the city to provide the animal shelter with $72,304. The society also receives revenues from the dog at cat licenses which are issued by the city (approximately $4,500 annually), and $6,900 in revenue from the rent of a tower located on shelter property (rental funds can only be used for maintenance of the property). Patek provided an activity report to the council Monday evening, which showed that the canine and feline numbers in 2016 were similar to 2015, with only a slight increase in the total incoming numbers. In 2016, the shelter took in 409 dogs and 381 cats. Of the dogs coming in during 2016, there were 112 rescued, 61 adopted, 125 returned to owners and 88 euthanized. Of the cats coming in, 53 were adopted, 21 were returned to their owners and 258 were euthanized. In 2015, of the 391 dogs coming in to the shelter, 92 were rescued, 84 adopted, 100 returned to their owners, and 101 euthanized. Of the 360 cats coming in, 87 were adopted, 11 returned to their owners, and 234 euthanized. Patek said that cases of abandoned animals continues and that animals are being found on gravel roads and along the highway. Patek noted that there are eight dogs at Chillicothe Correctional Center, going through the Puppies for Parole program, which she said has been a “wonderful program.” She also stated that the offenders working at the shelter through the work release program have been “excellent” help.