Corn and soybean harvest has started in the area and early indications suggest corn yields may be down from last year, and soybeans will likely be about the same.

 Corn and soybean harvest has started in the area and early indications suggest corn yields may be down from last year, and soybeans will likely be about the same. There were 117,000 acres of soybeans planted in Livingston County this year, which is about 7,700 more soybean acres than last year, according to the Farm Service Agency in Livingston County, and the most soybeans planted in at least five years. There are 41,000 acres of corn planted in Livingston County, which is about 6,000 more acres than last year. Corn harvest is well under way, said Jeanette Straker, FSA county executive director in Chillicothe. “Reports from local producers are saying earlier varieties and hill ground acres are showing an average of 150-180 bushels per acre with moisture at 15-17 percent,” Straker said. Later varieties and bottom ground have yields of 180 to 220 bushels per acre with moisture at 18 to 20 percent. Corn should be at least 15 percent moisture for safe storage, Straker said, noting that if it is higher the corn will need to be dried or will be docked at the elevator. The overall projected average yield for corn in Livingston County is 150 bushels per acre this year. The projected price is $3.64. Last year’s average corn yield was 170 bushels per acre. Some soybeans have already been harvested. “If we miss rain this week, a lot more acres will be harvested next week,” Straker said. The projected county average for soybeans is 46 bushels per acre, with the price at $9.59. Last year, the average yield for soybeans was 45 bushels per acre. Andy Luke, regional agronomy specialist for the University of Missouri Extension Office serving a seven-county region in northwest Missouri, said that harvest is about on schedule but dry conditions in the late part of summer are causing some yields to be lower than in past years. “We had spells in mid-July through August that were fairly dry throughout the area,” Luke said. “We didn’t get what we normally have.” The planting season was about normal, Luke said, noting that it may have been a little later than normal for soybeans, due to a cold spell that slowed soybean emergence. He noted that the recent warm weather helped dry down the corn.