Down Blue Mound way, we always cut open the seed of a persimmon to get a clue about what the winter weather was going to be like.

By Joe Dillard Contributing Writer

Down Blue Mound way, we always cut open the seed of a persimmon to get a clue about what the winter weather was going to be like. Depending upon what we found, we would know if we needed to cut an extra load of wood or not. To find out, we cut open a persimmon seed lengthwise to reveal the white part in the middle. The white part is actually the root. And the shape of the root, supposedly is a clue to what type of winter to expect. The root will either resemble a spoon, fork, or a knife. This year the root resembles a spoon. A root in the shape of a spoon signals a "snowy" winter. If the root looks like a knife, it will be an icy winter. A fork is the sign or signal of a mild winter. Have you wondered how the three shapes – the fork, knife, and spoon – came about? Well the spoon would be used to "dig out" of a snowy winter, a knife would cut through you like an icy wind, and a fork maybe meant you would have "good eats" in a mild winter. Although we saw a spoon, let’s hope for mild with “Good Eats!” Maybe that darned old persimmon was wrong after all. Joe G. Dillard Former, but always, a Blue Mounder