Two performances of the Missoula Children’s Theatre production of the musical “Gulliver’s Travels” will be presented in Chillicothe Saturday, Jan. 13.

Two performances of the Missoula Children’s Theatre production of the musical “Gulliver’s Travels” will be presented in Chillicothe Saturday, Jan. 13. More than 60 local and area students have been cast in the show, which will be staged in Chillicothe High School’s Gary Dickinson Performing Arts Center, 2800 Hornet Drive, at 3:00 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. that day. “Gulliver’s Travels” is listed online by Wikipedia as “a prose satire by Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift, that is both a satire on human nature and the "travellers' tales" literary subgenre. The book became popular as soon as it was published in the 1700s and is Swift's best-known full-length work, and a classic of English literature. The most-well-known aspect of the book is title character Lemuel Gulliver’s time and experiences in the fictional island country of Lilliput, whose inhabitants are only a half-foot tall. Swift himself claimed he wrote Gulliver's Travels "to vex the world rather than divert it," the Wikipedia listing details. Tickets for the performances will be available at the box office before each show on Saturday, Jan. 13. Adult tickets will be $6 and student tickets $3. Children not yet in kindergarten will be admitted free of charge, according to a news release by the Chillicothe Area Arts Council. Arts council season ticket holders will be admitted with their season ticket. The box office will open at 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. that afternoon and the audience will begin to be seated 30 minutes before the opening of each show. The children’s theater production is sponsored by the Chillicothe Area Arts Council through funding from the Roger A. Browning Foundation, Tria Sorosis women’s organization, and the Missouri Arts Council, a state agency. Recent years’ local productions by Missoula Children’s Theatre have “Peter and Wendy,” based on the story of Peter Pan, “Little Red Riding Hood,” and “The Jungle Book.”