After months of planning, moving day arrived Thursday morning for Darrin and Kim Crowe, of rural Chillicothe. The process was anything but typical as the move consisted of relocating an actual house north of town.

After months of planning, moving day arrived Thursday morning for Darrin and Kim Crowe, of rural Chillicothe. The process was anything but typical as the move consisted of relocating an actual house north of town. View photos of the move The 123-year-old house was moved from its foundation along U.S. Highway 65, just north of LIV 228/Kelsie Reeter Road. The structure was hauled north to LIV 216, then west, and then pulled across farm fields and through timbered areas until it reached its final destination, about four miles from its point of origin. “We realize that this isn’t for everyone, and some might think we are crazy, but this is us,” Kim told the C-T. “This is our passion. Both of us.” The destination was property which the Crowes had purchased a few years ago. They had built a shed on the land and made temporary living quarters at one end of the shed. Their plan was to build a new house on their property, but something about this old house made them change their minds. “The more we drove by this house, the more we loved it,” Kim said. She finally told her husband that this was the house she wanted. He agreed. The Crowes hired a company to do the actual move; however, Darrin did much of the preparation by removing a small house addition as well as two brick chimneys. The path of travel had to be prepared as well. The couple secured permission from five different land owners to cross their property for the house’s journey to its new location. Most of the property was pasture, but some timber was in the way. Darrin cut, split and stacked wood for the property owners. The Crowes were appreciative to the property owners. Crews arrived at the original site earlier this week and lifted the house onto a trailer. Thursday’s move took place with the assistance from the highway patrol, Chillicothe police and the electric company to ensure safety. The house basically amounts to a wooden shell that will be set on a basement. The couple will do the work themselves to refurbish and furnish the structure. “We can’t wait to roll up our sleeves and get to work,” Kim said. The structure was built in 1895, according to Livingston County assessor records.