On January 2, 2018, Lesley Patek, guardian of the Forrest O. Triplett Animal Shelter in Chillicothe, received a call from a local man about a female dog that had been found roaming one of the major highways near Chillicothe.

By Samuel EwbanK Contributing Writer On January 2, 2018, Lesley Patek, guardian of the Forrest O. Triplett Animal Shelter in Chillicothe, received a call from a local man about a female dog that had been found roaming one of the major highways near Chillicothe. As Patek talked to the man, she learned that he had picked up the dog and there was also a puppy involved. “I thought he was talking about one older pup,” stated Patek; but, once the conversation progressed, Patek learned that the man was referring to a newborn puppy and that the mother dog was not done giving birth. With this new discovery the plan changed from the mom dog and her puppy coming in on January 2nd to the mom dog and her puppy being left with the man to allow the rest of the puppies to be born. Once the new plans were made, Patek set up one of the rooms in the shelter to house the mother and new puppies once they arrived on January 3rd. The mother dog, now known as “Frances Bean” around the animal shelter, and her five puppies are doing well. Patek said the alternative to them being rescued would have probably been them “getting hit by a car or a coyote attacking them on the highway.” Frances Bean is an average size, yellow Labrador retriever mix, while her puppies are different colors and variations of their mom. Patek stated the different colors and looks come from the possibility of “many dads being involved.” Though things are going well for Frances Bean and her puppies, the dogs will eventually be moved to a foster home. The shelter is dealing with not having enough space for every animal that needs rescuing and many other dogs that need the shelter’s attention. The shelter places animals with people across the country who are willing to take care of them until they can find permanent homes. Many of the foster homes these animals go to are in Minnesota. According to Patek, the Chillicothe animal shelter currently is housing more than 60 animals that have ended up there for various reasons. Patek said that one of the main reasons animals end up in a shelter is that people don’t understand how much of a commitment pets take. “It costs quite a bit of money to feed, house, vaccinate, and in Chillicothe, to license a pet,” Patek said. If the commitment is not there, owners will usually release their pets to the shelter or their pets will get taken away due to neglect or abuse, she added. With the growing number of animals in this area that are becoming the responsibility of the Chillicothe animal shelter, the shelter is always in need of help. Help can be provided through donations for animal care and facility maintenance or adoptions of pets, Patek said.