One of Chillicothe’s oldest buildings was reduced to a pile of rubble after a demolition crew was called into action for safety reasons when a wall collapsed late Wednesday afternoon.

One of Chillicothe’s oldest buildings was reduced to a pile of rubble after a demolition crew was called into action for safety reasons when a wall collapsed late Wednesday afternoon. View photos

The building, located at the northeast corner of Locust and Calhoun Streets, was owned by Anderson TBA and was used by the business as a storage facility for tires. “The north wall started caving in,” Mike Anderson, owner of Anderson TBA, told the Constitution-Tribune. The wall collapsed around 4 p.m. Wednesday and during normal business hours. The business office, which is located just north of the storage building, was open but, fortunately, no one was in the storage facility when the wall collapsed. There were no injuries. After the wall collapsed, Anderson contacted Tammi Veneman, the city’s building inspector, who soon arrived at the scene. “I looked at the back wall that had fallen, then another section fell when I was there,” Veneman said. “I went to the Calhoun side, and saw that the south wall had kicked out.” About two hours later, the roof collapsed. Anderson decided to have the building torn down for safety reasons. Perkins Dozing and Demolition arrived at the location and worked late into the night to tear down the rest of the building. The Chillicothe Fire Department pumped water to control dust. Streets were blocked off in the area and remained closed throughout the night. Anderson TBA (Tire, Batteries and Accessories) has owned the building since 1960. The building was occupied by Anderson Produce before that time. The building’s history also includes A. Lowenstein Mercantile Company, a purveyor of wholesale eggs, wool and produce purchased from Livingston County farmers. A “ghost sign” reminiscent of the Lowenstein company was painted on the side of the building several years ago. The business bought and sold eggs and animal hides. The building’s history also includes Henderson Produce Company. Records indicate that the building was constructed in 1840. Anderson said he re-ordered inventory Wednesday night and some of it had arrived Thursday morning. He noted that the business has available storage and that the business opened Thursday with normal business hours.