The bluegrass sounds produced by Campbell family has been bringing smiles to the faces of crowds for several years and area residents will have a chance to see the family bluegrass band perform right here in Chillicothe from 10-11 a.m., on June 22 at the Chillicothe Farmers Market.

The bluegrass sounds produced by Campbell family has been bringing smiles to the faces of crowds for several years and area residents will have a chance to see the family bluegrass band perform right here in Chillicothe from 10-11 a.m., on June 22 at the Chillicothe Farmers Market.

Music has been a part of Margie Campbell’s life since she was a small girl learning the piano then mandolin. She first started playing with her father and grandfather and soon developed a love for bluegrass. As Margie and her husband, Clint, began a family so did their children's love for music and bluegrass. Their oldest son, Dalton, now almost 18, began playing the piano at age of 4 and the fiddle at 6. He plays bass and twin fiddle in the band, but will soon be leaving for the Marine Corps this fall. Luke, 15, began playing the piano at age 5, the violin at age 6 and now plays the guitar and sings lead in the band and also enjoys telling funny stories during their performances. Mary Caroline, 14, began playing the piano and fiddle at the age of 4 or 5, she is now a fiddle player and sings high harmony and sometimes melodies during performances. Charlie, 12, began playing the piano, fiddle and banjo at a young age. He now plays the banjo and lead guitar in the band. Michaela, 8, plays piano, fiddle and mandolin. While not the youngest Campbell child, Daisy at age 5 is the youngest in the group and she plays the fiddle.

Margie homeschools the children, and their days include focused time on practicing their art but said much of the credit for the musical skills goes to local music teacher, Joyce Stark.

“She has taught the kids bass, mandolin, guitar,” Margie said. “She has taught everyone something. And really helped us get started performing at the Baptist Home.”

Margie said that while performing is vital to their group, she said it is important to her that the Lord be involved and their children learning real life lessons outside of being musicians.

“Public speaking is important, each of them has to introduce a sibling and has a speaking part, which they write and memorize but have to be able to say it, like it hasn’t been memorized,” she said. The sets they play and perform are changed frequently so that every show is different.

When asked if it was easy to live with and perform with their siblings, the kids all answered, “not always,” and Margie said that is part of the lesson and challenge. “We are not a perfect family and it can be hard to always be with your siblings, but they come together and perform respectfully, and that is important.”

Mary Caroline and Charlie admit they are the shyest about speaking parts but love to perform musically. Luke is more at ease speaking to the crowd and Michaela who is “a very strong singer,” enjoys jamming, much like her older siblings. Daisy enjoys the interactive section of performances where they sing original songs that are meant to help children memorize God’s word.

Each child has individual lessons and when they learn a new song, must come back and teach it to their siblings for a show. This teaches humility and grace, Margie said. “It can be very hard to learn something and then have to teach it, especially to a sibling. It can be even harder to go to your sibling and ask for help learning their song,” she said. “Being a good musician isn’t just about being good, it is making sure the other members sound the best they can too and you help them with that. It is not about being in the spotlight yourself.”

The children attend musical camps throughout the summer, and are also members of the Heart of America Bluegrass and Old-time Music Association, which awards Charlie with a scholarship for music lessons as well.

The group enjoys their time together playing. Each family member has a role, including Clint who frequently runs sound for the shows. The children say some of their fondest memories include performing before Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver.

“To think it all started when we wanted to bring instruments to the Bluegrass Jam during Sliced Bread Days three years ago,” Margie said,. “We wanted to give children a chance to touch the instruments and from there and performing at the Baptist Home with the help of Joyce Stark, to where we are now.”